Built St. Louis > > The South Side > > Carondelet

The southeastern tip of the neighborhood, east of Broadway, is known as the Patch neighborhood. Home to a concentration of Irish immigrants in the mid-1800s, it was also heavily industrialized during the 19th Century thanks to its riverfront location and the coming of the Iron Mountain Railway along the river.

Off-site links:

  • Patch Neighborhood at Dotage St. Louis, with commentary on the area's extensive French Creole and other influences
  • Abundant limestone in this area was quarried by early German immigrants, leaving a legacy of small gray stone houses that still stand today throughout the area. They are among the city's oldest stone houses.

    This isolated house at Marceau Street and Vulcan Street reveals what looks like a much younger heritage on its party wall, where brick has been revealed by a long-lost neighbor. Built in 1852 by a German stonemason, it survives in use as offices the adjacent company.

    From shipyards nearby, James Eads - engineer of the Eads Bridge - built and launched Civil War ironclads for the Union. The first such vessel was named Carondelet. The site evolved into the St. Louis Ship-Federal Barge company, which operated on the same site until 1984. After two decades of vacancy, a pasta plant was built on much of the same land.

    From shipyards nearby, James Eads - engineer of the Eads Bridge - built and launched Civil War ironclads for the Union. The first such vessel was named Carondelet. The site evolved into the St. Louis Ship-Federal Barge company, which operated on the same site until 1984. After two decades of vacancy, a pasta plant was built on much of the same land.

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